Balloons in the studio. Note the chunk stuck to my cello!

The past two days have been fascinating. Nick and I continue to confront questions about our piece and imagine new possibilities!

Each day we play together, drink coffee and talk. Plus there are field trips! Yesterday we ventured to the U of Glasgow recording studio to capture the decay time of the vibrations of my cello (Nick is using the sound file as a reverb in his patch. He can turn the shape of the sound file into reverb through a convolution reverb object in Max)(sounds complicated, and apparently is!). This involved exploding balloons next to my cello and recording the sounds of the explosion! Balloons make everything better. Little colourful bundles of joy, and ours had smiley faces! Next I recorded some solo music to give Nick some sounds to practice with while we’re apart.

 

Today began with a trip to Glasgow’s post industrial underbelly, where we recording some sounds of scrap metal being loaded onto ships,

Nick Fells capturing sounds of scrap metal across a still River Clyde

pipes being constructed, planks being swan, multiple radio stations and birds. Many at the same time! Our idea is to give the possibility for field

recordings of each of our creation locations (Scotland and Nova Scotia) to be incorporated into the final. It was great to deeply listen to these fascinating soundscapes. I thought of Pauline.

 

This afternoon we had a show and tell with graduate students at the University. They seemed knowledgeable about the programming and mildly interested in the project. It was

The Baron Kelvin, after whom many bits of Glasgow are named.

good for us to turn on the performance jets to bring our listening up to the highest levels.

All these activities are surrounded by talking. About the piece and what it is, about music, art, education, politics, admin, society. It’s all very stimulating and challenging.

A rare day! This is a view north to the hills: decay, history, nature, all in one view.

 

One of the epic cranes of Glasgow. This is named the Whiteinch. Rusting glory….